Tag Archives: Paisley

John MacFarlane

John MacFarlane was a cabin passenger on the Blenheim.

The Glasgow Herald account of the departure of the Blenheim in its issue of 28 August 1840 noted that Mr John M’Farlane of Paisley was one of the cabin passengers.


Return to The Blenheim People.


In Jessie Campbell’s Journal of the voyage, John MacFarlane was described as “very stout”, and “a great, vulgar, harmless beast of a man.” On 18 November 1840 she noted, “Mr Macfarlane absent again today I hear his illness is occasioned by his being quite drunk in his cabin last night,” and two days later, “Mr Macfarlane obliged to go to bed before dinner again, his mind they say is not quite right. Dr Campbell says it is a slight attack of delerium tremens.” Over the next few days she reported on John MacFarlane’s paranoia over losing his land deeds, and claims of theft of his clothes, and thereafter the Journal notes his progress or lack of it in regaining good health.

At one point in her Journal, Jessie Campbell notes that J.B.S. (Mrs MacDonald) took a great deal of interest in John MacFarlane because he was “the only other lowlander on board”, apart from the captain. On 6 December 1840 Jessie Campbell reported, “Poor Macfarlane consulting Capt Gray what he could advise him to do on arriving in N Zealand; thought himself his best plan would be to marry some decent well-behaved woman that would take care of him, he was afraid he could have no choice but to take one of the emigrants, a great deal of laughing and joking about this after dinner today.”

No further information has been established for John MacFarlane.


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William Nicol and Janet Jamieson

William and Janet Nicholl and their family were described in the embarkation and subsequent lists for the Blenheim as coming from Paisley.  The family was listed as follows:

  • William Nicholl, 47, labourer
  • Janet Nicholl, 35
  • John Nicholl, 18, labourer
  • William Nicholl, 16, labourer
  • Charles Nicholl, 13
  • James Nicholl, 10
  • Janet Nicholl, 8

In all lists their name was spelled “Nicholl”.  However, in most documents prior to departure and subsequent to their arrival in New Zealand the spelling “Nicol” was used.


Return to The Blenheim People.


William Nicol and Janet Jamieson

William Nicol was born around 1793, and Janet Jamieson around 1805.

The Old Parish Register for Paisley High Church, Renfrew, for October 1804, records that a Janet Jamieson, legal daughter of John Jamieson and Janet Cochran, was born 22 ult. and baptized 5 inst, i.e. she was born on 22 September 1804.

The Old Parish Register for Paisley High Church, Renfrew, records the proclamation of William Nicol and Janet Jamieson, both in this Parish, on 17 June 1821, and the payment of one shilling for three proclamations. The proclamation of banns was the notice of contract of marriage, read out in the Kirk before the marriage took place. Couples or their ‘cautioners’ (sponsors) were often required to pay a ‘caution’ or security to prove the seriousness of their intentions. Forthcoming marriages were supposed to be proclaimed on three successive Sundays, however, in practice, all three proclamations could be made on the same day on payment of a fee.

William Nicol was described as a labourer of 47 when he emigrated to New Zealand.  William Nicol, Pipitea, labourer, was included on the list of persons qualified to serve as Jurors for the district of Port Nicholson in 1845, and in the 1847 to 1849 lists he was described as a tapkeeper,  Lambton Quay.

Janet Nicol died on 19 October 1848.  The Wellington Independent of 25 October 1848 carried the following report:

Died.—At her residence, Lambtonquay, on Thursday last, Mrs. Janet Nicol, aged 43 years.—An Inquest was held the following day at Barrett’s Hotel, on view of the body, before J. Fitzgerald, Esq., M. D., Coroner.—Mr. Nicol being called in stated, on Thursday the 19th instant, I found my wife lying on the floor (about 3 o’clock) apparently in a fit, but unfortunately she was dead; she had not five minutes before served the coxswain of the Fly’s gig, with a bottle of grog; when I went into the room she was lying on the floor amongst broken dishes and water, which must have been capsized at the time she had fallen by the severe shock of an earthquake the large cask in which we kept our, water having been upset. The Jury after a short consultation returned a verdict, died of apoplexy.

The Wanganui Chronicle of 19 March 1878 carried the Death Notice: “Nicol – On the 17th inst., at the residence of his son, Mr Charles Nicol, Marton, William Nicol, formerly of Paisley, Scotland, aged 80 years.  The funeral will take place today, at half-past 2 p.m.”

John Nicol

John Nicol was described as a labourer of 18 on the Blenheim passenger list.

The Old Parish Register for November 1821 for Abbey, Renfrew, recorded that John, son of William Nicol and Janet Jamieson was born on 21 October and baptized on 18 November.

The following information remains to be confirmed as applying to this John Nicol.

New Zealand BDM records show the marriage of a John Nichol and E Rori Kapiti on 4 November 1841.  The records also show a birth, name not recorded, parents Betty and John Nicol, on 17 June 1848.

The Wellington Independent of 24 April 1847 published a Notice from the Treasury, Wellington, dated 23 April 1847, giving notice of the issue of Special Publican’s Licences to, among others, John Nicol, Pukarua [Pukerua?]. A John Nicol was also included in the list, published in the Wellington Independent of 13 August 1853,  of Gentlemen who had consented to act as a Committee to secure the return of W B Rhodes, Esq., to represent the Wellington Country District in the General Assembly.  The Electoral Rolls for Wellington and Wellington Country for 1853-64 included a John Nicol, Paekakariki, publican, qualification a household near Wainui.

The Wellington Independent of 16 September 1869 carried a lengthy report of legal proceedings relating to the lease of an accommodation or public house at Paekakariki, on land owned by Betty Nicol, the Maori wife of John Nicol – apparently known as “Scotch Jock”.  The Nicols lived at Waikanae.

William Nicol

William Nicol was a labourer of 16 on the Blenheim passenger list.

William Nicol Jnr, Lambton Quay, servant, was included on the list of persons qualified to serve as Jurors for the district of Port Nicholson in 1847.

The New Zealand Spectator and Cook’s Strait Guardian of 9 July 1847 carried a report of a case in the Resident Magistrate’s Court where William Nicol appeared on a summons to answer the charge of having refused to support the male infant of Caroline Gooden, of which it was alleged he was the father.

The New Zealander of 9 April 1851 published the list of applications for Publicans’ Licenses, noting that if they were all to succeed the number of public houses in Auckland and its neighbourhood would be nearly doubled at once, and suggesting that they should be as much as possible confined to the leading thoroughfares since “In the back and little frequented streets they too frequently become rather nuisances and receptacles of vice.”  William Nicol, Black Bull, Albert St, was on the list of new applicants.  In 1855, William Nicol, Masonic Hotel, Princes street, was on the list of applicants.

William Nicol married Jane Harriet Brown on 9 April 1853 in Auckland.

The Electoral Rolls for Auckland, Southern Division, for 1853-1864 included William Nicol, Princes street, hotel keeper, freehold estate.

William Nicol retired from the Masonic Hotel in 1869, the occasion being recognised by the United Service Lodge of Freemasons, as reported in the New Zealand Herald of 1 April 1869.

Jane Harriet Nicol died in 1875 aged 49.  The Daily Southern Cross of 12 August 1875 carried the Death Notice: “Nicol – On August 10, at her residence Grey-street, Harriett Jane, the beloved wife of Mr William Nicol, aged 49 years.”

The Wanganui Chronicle of 2 May 1877 noted, “We regret to learn that Mr William Nicol, eldest brother of Mr Charles Nicol, of Marton, died at Auckland on Friday last.  He was for some time the proprietor of the Masonic Hotel at Auckland, but retired into private life some time ago.”  The Auckland Star of 27 April 1877 had carried the Death Notice: “Nicol – On the 27th instant, at Grey-street, Auckland, William Nicol, in the 56th year of his age.”

William and Harriet had at least seven children:

  • William Henry Nicol, born in 1855, died in 1880, married Rachel Darby in 1875.
  • Emily Elizabeth Jane Nicol, born in 1856, married Edgar Patteson Hulme in 1876.
  • Frederick Thomas Nicol, born in 1858, died in 1927.
  • Harriet Annie Nicol, born in 1859, died in 1887.
  • James McNeill Nicol, born in 1861, died in 1904.
  • Alfred Alexander Nicol, born in 1863, died in 1947.
  • Lucy Isabella Nicol, born in 1865, married Donald Alexander McLeod in 1893.

Charles Nicol

Charles Nicol was 13 when he set out with his family on the Blenheim in 1840.

Charles Nicol and Catherine Jane Murray were married on 20 April 1852 at Wanganui.

In 1865 Charles Nicol founded  a bakery business in Marton, which was taken over by his son John Murray Nicol in 1895.

The Wanganui Chronicle of 5 April 1883 included the Death Notice: “Nicol – On the 3rd April, at Marton, Charles Nicol (brother to Mrs. John Cudby, Lower Hutt), aged 55 years.”  An obituary was published in the same issue:

THE LATE MR NICOL.
The funeral of the late Mr Charles Nicol took place yesterday afternoon at the Mount View Cemetery, near Marton. The burial service over the grave was performed by the Rev. Mr Stewart and a great number of friends from Wanganui and all parts of the district paid a last tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased by attending his funeral rites. The late Mr Nicol was a very old and respected settler. He came to Port Nicholson in 1840, in the good ship Blenheim (Captain Gray), which landed its passengers at Kaiwarra. Amongst Mr Nicol’s fellow-voyagers were Captain Cameron, of Marangai, Mr Gregor McGregor, and many other of our leading settlers. Mr Nicol learned the trade of baker in Wellington, and in 1848 came to Wanganui, and was employed to bake for Messrs Taylor and Watt. He subsequently became the possessor of the property in Wickstead Pace now owned by’ Mr Henry Churton and here he carried on his business very successfully for many years, during which he held the bread contracts for the troops stationed in Wanganui. Misfortunes, however, came thick upon him due to his own easy good nature, and the misplaced confidence he reposed in his friends. Taking his large family with him, Mr Nicol went some years ago to try his fortune in the new and rising township of Marton, and there he remained until his death on Tuesday last, at the comparatively early age of 54. Mr Nicol leaves behind him many children, all of them growing up, and having before them every prospect of doing well. As a man and a citizen the deceased gentleman was greatly respected, and he will long be missed by his old friends who knew his amiability of temper, unfailing good nature and sterling worth.

Catherine Jane (Murray) Nicol died on 16 July 1919 at Marton, aged 89.

Charles and Catherine had at least six children:

  • Mary Nicol, born in 1853, died in 1926, married Thomas Stoddart Lambert, architect, in 1871.
  • Janet Nicol, born in 1854, died in 1919, married John Aitken in 1876.
  • John Murray Nicol, born in 1861, died in 1918, married Emma Sophia Bensemann in 1883.
  • Margaret Kate Nicol, born in 1868.
  • Annie Harriet Nicol, born in 1869, married William Williams in 1903.
  • Ellen McFarlane Nicol, born in 1871, died in 1954, married Robert Joseph Carter in 1895.

James Nicol

James Nicol was 10 years old in 1840 when he sailed on the Blenheim to New Zealand with his family.

James Nicol and Isabella Smith were married on 5 March 1861.

James Nicol died in 1918.  The Wairarapa Age of 23 October 1916 carried the following obituary:

MR. JAMES NICOL. Another of the very early settlers of New Zealand, in the person of Mr James Nicol, passed away at his residence in Church Street, Masterton, about eight o’clock on Saturday morning.  The deceased, who had reached the great age of 85 years was born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1831. With his parents he arrived in Wellington in the ship Blenheim on Christmas Day, 1840.   When quite a lad he became associated with horses, and was employed for some time in the stable of the late Dr. Fitzgerald. He afterwards had the mounts on the j horses of Mr St. Hill. In 1846 he rode the mare Bella at Bunham Water, Wellington, and was just defeated on the post.  In 1847 he rode the winner of the Te Aro Steeplechase. Later he owned Retribution, the winner of the first New Zealand Steeplechase, since called the Grand National Steeplechase. He also owned the stallion Riddlesworth, one of the first thoroughbred horses to be imported to the Dominion. In 1852 he went to Australia, and was present at the Bendigo gold rush. For a number of years he drove cattle for Wairarapa settlers round the. “Rocks” to Wellington, before the road was constructed over the Rimutaka. Subsequently he became part owner, with the late Mr Hume, of the Blairlogie station, and later resided at the Lower Taueru. In 1870 he came to Masterton, where he has resided ever since. He owned for many years the freehold of the Empire Hotel and possessed other property interests in the town. He was a splendid judge of horseflesh, and a skilled veterinarian. He was the oldest vestryman of St. Matthew’s Church, and was scrupulously conscientious in all his dealings. He was a member of the Scotch Lodge of Freemasons, and was a Sergeant in the Cavalry in the early days. In 1862 the deceased married Miss Isabella Smith, daughter, of the late Mr John Smith, one of the earliest engineers in Wellington. He leaves a widow, two daughters, and four sons The daughters are. Mrs Vincent Hooper (Auckland) and Mrs W. C. Cargill (Morrinsville). The sons are Messrs John Nicol (Te Aroha), George Nicol (Picton), Private Arthur Nicol (on active service), and Mr Len. Nicol, jeweller, of Masterton. The deceased was highly respected by all with whom he was acquainted, and his death will be deeply, regretted. The funeral takes place to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at 3 o’clock.

James and Isabella had eight children:

  • William Smith Nicol, born in 1863, died in 1865.
  • Harriet Jane Nicol, born in 1864, died in 1941, married Vincent Hooper in 1885.
  • John Robert Nicol, born in 1867, died in 1959, married Elizabeth Barratt in 1892.
  • George William Nicol, born in 1869, died in 1943, married Katrina Neilson in 1903.
  • Isabella Emily Nicol, born in 1871, married William Clement Cargill in 1894.
  • Frederick James Nicol, born in 1873.
  • Arthur Charles Nicol, born in 1876, died in 1941, married Lillian May Jackson in 1900, divorced in 1910, married Caroline Fanny Whyatt in 1920.
  • Leonard Spencer Nicol, born in 1883, died in 1950, married Stella Maud Clark in 1919.

Janet Nicol

Janet Nicol was 8 when she travelled to New Zealand on the Blenheim in 1840.

BDM records show the marriage of Jane Nicholl to John Francis Cudby on 9 November 1849.

John Francis Cudby was born on 28 February 1830 in Ingrave, Essex, England, to John Cudby and Henrietta Clampin.  He emigrated to New Zealand in 1842, aged 13, on the Thomas Sparks.  John’s brother Charles also emigrated to New Zealand in 1857 on the William and Alfred.

John Cudby established a contracting business for earthworks and construction, then added a coaching business, which was taken over by his sons George and Walter.

Janet Cudby died in 1907 aged 74. The Manawatu Standard of 2 November 1907 published the following obituary:

Mrs Janet Cudby, a much-respected resident of the Lower Hutt, died at the family residence yesterday morning, aged 74. The deceased lady, who is survived by her husband, Mr John Cudby, had lived in the Hutt district for a great many years, and went through all the trials of the early settlers. She had been ill for some time. The members of her family have been identified with the Hutt all their lives, and with their father have taken a prominent part in the development of the district.

John Francis Cudby died in 1920, at the age of 90.  The Evening Post of 8 June 1920 carried the Death Notice: “Cudby – On the 8th June, 1920, at his late residence, Railway-avenue, Lower Hutt, John Francis Cudby, relict of the late Janet Cudby, in his 91st year. R.I.P.”  The paper also had the following obituary:

MR. J. F. CUDBY
An early settler, who grew up with the Hutt district, Mr. John Francis Cudby, died at his residence, Railway-avenue, Lower Hutt, early this morning. Mr. Cudby’s interests from early youth had been in the Hutt Valley, and his history was the history of this fertile district. No one could tell its history better than he himself, for he had experienced the events and times of which he spoke and remembered them, even when he had reached the age where, with many men, the memory becomes dim. He was born in Essex in 1828, and came out to New Zealand with Lord Petre as a lad in 1843 in the ship Commerce Sparks. From the time of his arrival in the country to the day of his death, he resided at Lower Hutt. At first he lived and worked on the Woburn estate. Afterwards he became the owner of large livery stables near the railway station. He retired from active participation in the business some forty years ago, but continued to take a very lively interest in the affairs of the district. He possessed the hard, commonsense which was a distinguishing trait of many early settlers, and this made him a valued member of the Lower Hutt Borough Council for many years. He was also a member of the Licensing Committee, and as a Justice of the Peace for over thirty years was a familiar figure on the Hutt Magistrate’s Court Bench. He resigned from the Commission of the Peace two years ago. In the early days of the Wellington Racing Club he held the office of Clerk of the Course. In friendly society work he was a staunch supporter, and he held the record of seventy years’ membership of the Oddfellows Lodge. Mr. Cudby enjoyed good health, in spite of his years, until two years ago. He leaves a family of five sons and three daughters. The sons are: James, living at Lower Hutt; Charles, at Dannevirke; Henry, Alfredton; George, Rangiora; and Walter, Lower Hutt. The daughters are Mrs. J. Fleet, Petone; Mrs. Turner, Lower Hutt; and Mrs. E. D. Dunne, Wellington. Mrs. Cudby, who was also an early settler, having come out from Paisley, Scotland, in the Janet Nicol [sic], died twelve years ago. At the meeting, of the Hutt County Council this morning, a motion of sympathy was passed with the deceased’s relatives, the members standing as a mark of respect.

Jane and John had nine children:

  • James Cudby, born in 1852, died in 1923.
  • William Cudby, born in 1851, died in 1908, married Emily Frances Rivers in 1883.
  • Charles Cudby, born in 1854, died in 1942, married Emma Catherine McIntosh in 1882.
  • Emma Frances Cudby, born in 1858, died in 1941, married Joseph Frederick Fleet in 1884.
  • Henry Cudby, born in 1860, died in 1946.
  • George Cudby, born in 1862 (registration 1913), died in 1934, married Jane Muirhead in 1896.
  • Henrietta Cudby, born in 1864, died in 1955, married James Turner in 1890.
  • Walter Thomas Cudby, born in 1868, died in 1926.
  • Ada Winifred Cudby, born in 1871, died in 1958, married Edward Dowling Dunne in 1898.

Sources:

Alexander Thompson and Helen Gollan

Alexander and Helen Thompson were not on the initial passenger list for the Blenheim, but did appear on the embarkation and subsequent lists:

  • Alexander Thompson, 28, Paisley, labourer
  • Helen Thompson, 26, Paisley

Spelling: Although the Blenheim passenger lists used “Thompson” most other records have “Thomson”.


Return to The Blenheim People.


Based on the details in the Blenheim passenger list, Alexander Thomson was born around 1812 and his wife Helen around 1814.

The Old Parish Register for Paisley Middle parish records that Alexander Thomson, lawful son of Alexander Thomson and Margaret Robertson, was born on 27 October 1812 and baptized on 15 November 1812.

The Old Parish Register for Barony in Lanark, recorded the marriage on 15 May 1836 of Alexander Thomson, cotton spinner, Calton, and Helen Gollan, residing there.

From the reports below, it appears that Alexander and Helen moved to Auckland shortly after the arrival of the Blenheim, and eventually settled on a farm in West Tamaki.

The Auckland Star of 14 June 1886 provided a full report of the Golden Wedding celebrations for the couple:

A GOLDEN WEDDING.
The golden wedding of Mr and Mrs Alex. Thomson was celebrated on the evening of Thursday, the l0th inst., in the Presbyterian Church of Tamaki West. The little church was very artistically decorated for the occasion with evergreens, white and pink camellias, and other flowers of the season. About three hundred visitors were invited, and the church was literally crowded. An excellent repast was provided, chiefly by Mrs Thomson. Tables the whole length of the inside of the building were liberally spread with the daintiest viands. A number of ladies of Tamaki and neighbouring settlementa courteously waited at the table. After a bountiful tea, the Rev. John Macky took the cbair, supported by Mr and Mrs Thomson, Mr William Thorne, and immediate relations. The proceedings opened with the hymn “Praise Ye Jehovah” and prayer by Rev. R. F. Macnicol. The Chairman then made a few appropriate remarks upon the auspicious event, and called upon the Rev. Mr Steele to read apologies from well-wishers who were unavoidably absent, viz., the Revs. David Bruce, A. Carrick, T. M. King (St. John’s College), Mr James Bell, of Wairoa, and several others. The Chairman proceeded and expressed the pleasure he felt in the position which he had been called upon to occupy. He felt sure that in wishing Mr and Mrs Thomson much happiness on the event of their golden wedding day, every heart would respond to the prayer that their kind friends might be spared many years longer in their career of usefulness in connection with the locality and the church. He had known Mr and Mrs Thomson intimately ever since he was first introduced to them thirty three years ago. Having spoken at some length in eulogistic terms of the amiable qualities of his friends, he would call upon Mr Thomson to speak for himself and his aged partner. Mr Thomson, on rising, was greeted with prolonged applause, and proceeded to say that he had frequently said that if it should please God to spare him and Mrs Thomson to see fifty years of married life, he would have all Tamaki and half Auckland present to celebrate the happy event. He had not much to say to married guests upon the subject of matrimony, but he hoped they would all live to see their golden wedding, and be able to look back over half a century with as much retrospective pleasure and satisfaction as he looked over his past. He then gave some advice to unmarried men, enforcing the words of the highest authority, “It is not good for man to be alone,” the truth of which he and his partner had proved in their early colonial struggle by being united. They had found in their mutual endeavours that “two heads are better than one.” The speaker then gave a pleasing sketch of his life from tho time when he started with others from Glasgow, in 1840, by the good ship Blenheim for Wellington, and of his arrival in Auckland with Sir William Martin, the Hon. William Swainson, Mr Outhwaite, and others. He and his partner worked hard, and at length saved sufficient money to purohase Water Yett, Tamaki, the farm upon which he and Mrs Thomson had laboured 40 years. He now occupied the building which formed the first Presbyterian Church in the province. A preacher, still living in Scotland, characterised the church as a barn, and the pulpit a tea chest. He did not approve of the terms. The little church, however, had boen of real service to the people of the district, and the ministrations from that so-called “tea chest” had proved a blessing to many. Mr Thomson then sketched the history of the church and the Sunday school and Bible class, with which he had been closely connected, for the long term of forty-five years, concluding with several suggestions for practical work and general improvement. At Mr Thomson’s request, Rev. Mr Steele read the marriage lines, which showed that Alexander Thomson, bachelor, and Ellen Gollan, spinster, were married on the 2nd of June, 1836, by the Rev. John Edwards, in the Monteith Row Church, Glasgow. (Loud cheers.) Short congratulatory addresses were successively given by Rev. T. G. Carr, D. W. Runciman, G. E. Monro, K. F. Macnicol, Thomas Norrie and Mr Hunter. Between these brief speeches several sacred selections and songs ware sung. Mrs Kimpton, of Otahuhu, sang the old but very appropriate song, “Darby and Joan,” with telling effect. The same lady, with Miss Wallace, sang a duet, and subsequently the fine lyric entitled “Charity.” Miss Pulman sang “Too Late,” with pianoforte accompaniment. Mr James Wallace gave a recitation, “The Young Man Leaving Home,” with much elocutionary skill. Miss Lily Pulman then recited “The Golden Wedding Song,” written for the occasion by Mr John Blackman, which was received in a kindly spirit. This effusion was distinctly and clearly enunciated by the reciter. A splendid picture of the aged pair, photographed by Pulman, Shortland-street, was then exhibited to the audience, elegantly framed. The wedding cake was then cut by the bride with the silver knife and distributed to the assembled visitors. The cake was the gift of Mrs Carr and Messrs W and A, Thorne. The Rev. Mr Steele, on behalf of the company, expressed thanks to Mr and Mrs Thomson, to the ladies of the tea tables, and to all who had assisted in contributing to the entertainment, and the whole closed with the Benediction pronounced by the Chairman.

His death registration shows that Alexander Thomson died on 3 August 1886 at St Andrews Church of Scotland. He was a farmer of 73, the son of Alexander Thomson, stonemason, and Margaret Robertson, was born in Paisley, had been in New Zealand for 46 years, and had been married in Glasgow at 25 to Helen Gollan. There were no living children. The cause of death was apoplexy.

The Auckland Star of 4 August 1886 carried the Death Notice: “Thomson – On August 3, Alexander Thomson of West Tamaki.” The New Zealand Herald of 4 August 1886 included the following account of his life and death:

SUDDEN DEATH AT THE MEETING OF THE AUCKLAND PRESBYTERY.
At the meeting of the Auckland Presbytery, yesterday afternoon, a very sad event occurred. After the Presbytery had concluded the business before it, Mr. Alexander Thomson, an elder residing at Panmure, and representing the church at West Tamaki, rose, having taken no part in the business previously, and asked that the Presbytery should proceed then to inquire whether the collections for the foreign missions appointed by the Assembly had been made by the several congregations. To this the Presbytery at once agreed, out of respect to Mr. Thomson, and was about to carry nut the request when he was observed to have fallen back in his chair in what appeared to be a fainting fit. He was immediately unconscious and, a pallor coming over his features, it became evident that death was at hand. The Moderator and the other members near him did all they could to ease his position, but the heart had ceased its pulsations. Dr. Kenderdine was present in a few minutes, and pronounced life extinct, the cause being apoplexy. After some time had elapsed, and the body had been removed into the vestry, the Presbytery met for a few minutes, and Mr. Carrick, at the Moderator’s request, engaged in prayer, the Presbytery adjourning its meeting until to-day, at ten a.m.
The deceased gentleman was 75 years of age, and on the 10th of June last celebrated his golden wedding. It appears that about two years ago he received injury in the chest from the kick of a horse, which at the time caused a very dangerous illness. Since his recovery he had been subject to fainting fits, and yesterday morning, when coming to the Presbytery meeting, he complained of not feeling well. Mr. Thomson came to Wellington in 1840, and after remaining there for about a year he came to Auckland, where he has been ever since, on a farm at the Tamaki. He leaves a widow, but no children. Deceased was an active member of the Presbyterian Church, and took a great interest in the Sunday schools and in other departments of Church work. He was kindly, frank, and hospitable.

The Auckland Star of 14 August 1886 also provided an obituary:

Mr Alexander Thomson, a very old settler of Tamaki West, and an elder of the Presbyterian Church, died on Tuesday, August 3, at the sitting of the Presbytery in St. Andrew’s Church. Mr Thomson came into town early and transacted a considerable amount of business,and while dining at a friend’s house in Shortland street said he feared he had overdone it. He felt somewhat weary, and his breathing was difficult. He left for the meeting of Presbytery at St. Andrew’s, and was speaking upon the subject of the collections of the churches for Foreign Missions, when suddenly he staggered and fell back unconscious upon the seat. A pallor immediately overspread his features, and it was evident that the hand of death «as upon him. Mr Lennox ran for Dr. Kenderdine, and that gentleman, on arrival, pronounced life extinct. The cause of his death was apoplexy. The body was removed at the moderator’s request into the vestry, and subsequently was placed in a shell and removed by Mr Wm. Thorne, solicitor, a nephew of deceased, to Mr Thomson’s late residence. Deceased was born in Glasgow in I811, so that he had reached his 75th year. In early life Mr Thomson was a cotton weaver in his native city, and was of a quiet and religious disposition. He was married June 2, 1836, to Ellen Gollan, in Glasgow, and four years from that auspicious event, in 1840, the young pair left Glasgow in the good ship Blenheim, for the city of Wellington, and after staying there for some months, sailed for Auckland, and filled in this city and suburbs several positions of trust. Mr Thomson and his partner settled on a small farm at West Tamaki, known as Water Yett, where they lived for more than 40 years. Mr Thomson told the story of his colonial struggles with graphic force on the occasion of the celebration of his “golden wedding” in June last. The funeral of the deceased was very largely attended, several hundred persons joining in the procession. A short service at the house was conducted by the Rev. John Macky, sen., minister of the united charge of Otahuhu, Tamaki, and Howick, and the Rev. T. G. Carr, Wesleyan minister (nephew of the deceased by marriage). On arriving at the cemetery the coffin was carried into St. Enoch’s Church, where service was performed by the Revs. J. Macky and T. Norrie, the former giving an appropriate address, in which he spoke of the Christian character of the deceased, and the good services he had rendered in the district for many years, especially to the younger members of the resident families, and concluded by urging all to follow his example. The Rev. D. Bruce and Rev. Mr Steele conducted the service at the grave, near the church.

Helen Thomson, widow of 84, died on 14 May 1898, at Pakuranga. No details of her parents were included in death registration, although it was noted that her father was a schoolteacher. Helen was born in Glasgow, and had been in New Zealand for 58 years. She was married in Glasgow at 18 to Alexander Thomson. There were no living children. The cause of death was senile decay.

The New Zealand Herald of 16 May 1898 carried the death Notice: “Thomson – On Saturday May 14, Helen, the widow of the late Alexander Thomson, of West Tamaki, aged 84.”

The reports above refer to a nephew, William Thorne, solicitor, and nephew by marriage, the Rev T G Carr. William Thorne and Matilda Carr were the children of William Thorne and Mary Gollan, Helen’s sister, who were married in 1846. Mary Gollan emigrated to New Zealand on the Duchess of Argyle which sailed from Greenock to Auckland in 1842. She was 30. There was another family of Gollans from Glasgow on this ship, headed by James Gollan, 33, and including his wife Abigail and several children.


Sources:

Mathew and Margaret Dunnet

In the Blenheim embarkation and subsequent lists, the family was described as follows:

      • Mathew Dunnet, 36, Paisley, labourer, 36
      • Margaret Dunnet, 33, Paisley
      • John Dunnet 7½, Paisley
      • Janet Dunnet, 4, Paisley
      • plus Ellen Thomson Dunnet, born at sea

An Andrew Dunnet, 22, Pulteney, cartwright,  was included in the initial passenger list for the Blenheim but the name was crossed out and did not appear on subsequent lists.

Note on spelling: In different records spellings used include “Mathew” or “Matthew”, “Dunnet” or “Dunnett” and “Barbour” or “Barber”. The text below generally follows the document used.


Return to The Blenheim People.


Matthew Dunnet and Margaret Barbour

The Old Parish Register for the Paisley parish of Abbey, Renfrew, recorded that Matthew Dunnet, son of John Dunnet and Sarah Sinklar [Sinclair], was born on 3 February and baptized on 19 February 1804.

Margaret Barbour was also born in Paisley in about 1808.

Family trees on Ancestry.com suggest that in addition to  their children John and Janet, there was also a son David, who died before the departure of the Blenheim.

The marriage of Matthew Dunnet and Margaret Barbour was recorded on 8 December 1832 in the parish of Paisley Burgh or Low, and on 9 December 1832 in the parish of Paisley Middle.

In 1840 Matthew and Margaret sailed to New Zealand on the Blenheim with their two surviving children John and Janet.  A child, Ellen Thomson Dunnet, was born at sea on the Blenheim.

The family lived in Wellington for 10-11 years, during which time further children were born – Annie (19 April 1843), Sarah (1846), and Margaret (1848-1850).

Annie’s birth registration gave her name as Anne, born 19 April 1843 at Wellington; father Matthew Dunnett, labourer, born at Paisley, High Church parish; mother Margaret Barbour.

The Wellington Independent of 6 April 1850 carried the following item: “Died on Tuesday, April 2, Margaret, daughter of Matthew and Margaret Dunnet, aged 20 months.”  Also, the New Zealand Spectator and Cook’s Strait Guardian of 6 April 1850 had the following: “At Wellington, of croup, on the 2nd inst., Margaret, daughter of Mr and Mrs Dunnett, of Tinakore road, aged 20 months.”

The family moved to Victoria, Australia, sometime around 1851, where Matthew worked as a miner.

Matthew Dunnett died on 2 October 1871 at Dunolly Hospital, Dunolly, Victoria.  He was a miner aged 67, born in Paisley Scotland, 12 years in New Zealand, 20 years in Victoria, married 25 years to Margaret Barber, who he married when he was 28.  His issue included John 37, David deceased, Janet 35?, Ellen deceased, Annie 27, Sarah 25 and Margaret deceased. The cause of death was inflammation and suppuration of the brain, debility, 6 weeks. Mathew was buried at Dunolly Cemetery.

Margaret Dunnett died on 8 April 1882.  She was a widow of 74, born in Paisley Scotland, her father being David Barber, chair manufacturer.  Margaret was 13 years in New Zealand, 29 in Victoria, and was married in Paisley, being married for 25 years to Matthew Dunnet, and was 25 when she married him.  Issue included John 48, Janet 44, Ann 40 and Sarah 38. The cause of death was old age, 5 months. The informant was John Dunnet, son, Ararat.  Margaret was buried at Ararat Cemetery, Victoria.

Annie Dunnet married James Gardner Welsh, a miner, in Inglewood, Victoria, and died in Collingwood, Melbourne on 20 February 1907.  She had 13 children.

No records relating to Sarah Dunnet have been traced, apart from the references in her parents’ death registrations.

John Dunnet

John Dunnet was born on 9 August 1833 and baptized on 26 December 1833, as recorded in the Old Parish Register for Paisley High Church, Renfrew, Scotland.  His parents were Matthew Dunnet and Margaret Barbour.

John Dunnet married Mary Anne Lemin in 1868.

John Dunnett died in 1901 in Ararat, Victoria, Australia, aged 68.  His parents were given as Matthew Dunnett and Margaret Barbour.

Janet Dunnet

Janet Dunnet was born, probably in Paisley, around 1836 and was still living in Australia at the time of her mother’s death in 1882.

A Janet Dunnet married a William McAlpine in Victoria in 1866, and they may have had at least five children.

Ellen Thomson Dunnet

Ellen Thomson Dunnett was born at sea on the Blenheim on 16 November 1840 – Jessie Campbell’s Journal for 17 November 1840 notes, “Another added to our number by the birth of a daughter to a man from Risley. Mother and child doing well, this is the 5th birth on board all doing well…Lat.40-23. Long. 37-29.”

The New Zealand birth registration noted that Ellen Thomson, fourth child of Matthew Dunnett and Margaret Barbour both late of Paisley spouses, was born at sea on board of the Blenheim Emigrant Ship 16 November 1840. The registration was made on 24 January 1840.

It appears that Ellen died before 1871 when her father died.


Sources:

James Mitchell and Jane Stewart

James Mitchell and his family were listed in the embarkation and arrival lists for the Blenheim as being as being from Paisley, with details as follows:

  • James Mitchell, 29, labourer
  • Jane Mitchell, 28
  • Marion Mitchell, 5
  • Jane Mitchell, 3

Return to The Blenheim People.


James Mitchell and Jane Stewart

James Mitchell was born around 1811, while Jean Stewart was born on 19 November 1812.

According to the Old Parish Register for January 1835 for Abbey in Renfrew, James Mitchell, weaver, Silk Street, and Jean Stewart, residing in George Street, both in this parish, were married on the 25th by the Reverend Andrew Symington, Paisley.

The family emigrated to New Zealand on the Blenheim, arriving in Wellington in  December 1840.   After living at Molesworth Street the family moved to Porirua where James purchased land and took up farming.  Their homestead was named “Burnside”.

Jane died on 10 June 1883 aged 70.  The Manawatu Standard of 15 June 1883 recorded that “Another old Wellington settler has passed away by the death of Mrs James Mitchell at her residence, Alma lane, off Tory street. The deceased lady was one of the pioneer settlers, having arrived in Wellington by the Blenheim in 1840, and was one of the first to settle at Porirua. The funeral, which took place yesterday, was attended by a large number of old settlers.”

James Mitchell died on 15 August 1890 aged 79.

James Mitchell’s brother John arrived in Wellington on the Marriner in 1850, and built a home next to Burnside.  In 1853 he married Helen Brown, who had also come out on the Marriner with her parents, and was a niece of James and Mary Brown who emigrated on the Blenheim and were the first settlers in Upper Hutt.  John Mitchell died three months after the marriage, but their son John succeeded to his uncle’s farm in 1875.  John Mitchell, the younger, described in the Cyclopedia of New Zealand as, “a keen, pushing business man”, had the farm at Porirua, another at Longburn in the Manawatu, and promoted two butchery businesses.  In 1876 he married Nancy Allen, a daughter of Mr Eli Allen, a farmer at Tawa Flat, whose mother was from an English family of Mitchells.  The Burnside property was eventually sold to the government to become part of the Porirua mental asylum.

Marion Mitchell

The Old Parish Register for Paisley High Church in Renfrew for December 1835, records that Marion, lawful daughter of James Mitchell and Jean Stewart was born on 3 ult, and baptized on 6th instant.

Marion travelled with her family to New Zealand on the Blenheim in 1840.

Marion Mitchell married Andrew Orr on 8 October 1869, but he apparently absconded, leaving Marion with four daughters.

The Wairarapa Daily of 28 September 1905 reported that “the death occurred on Monday last, at Wellington, of Mrs M Orr, who arrived in the Colony in 1840 on the ship Blenheim, and was the eldest daughter of Mr James Mitchell, who was one of the first to settle in the Porirua district.”

Marion and Andrew had four daughters:

  • Jane Orr, born in 1870, married James Jacob Esson in 1891, and died in 1956, aged 86. James Jacob Esson was a telegraphist in Post Office in the 1880s and 90s but during World War 1 became a Lieutenant-Colonel, and from 1922-25 was Secretary to the Treasury.
  • Mary Ann Orr, born in 1872, died in 1873 aged 15 months.
  • Marion Orr, born in 1873, married George Webb in 1899, died in 1938.
  • Ann Orr, born in 1878, died in 1945.
Jane Mitchell

Jane Mitchell was born around 1837 in Paisley, and travelled to New Zealand on the Blenheim in 1840 with her parents.

Jane Mitchell married Robert Miller on 24 June 1859.   Robert Miller was also a passenger on the Blenheim, as a 9 year old, the son of William and Maria Miller of Glasgow.  Robert Miller was a successful baker and businessman, and also served as a City Councillor.

The Wellington Independent of 26 October 1867 carried the following Death Notice: “Miller – On October 24, at the residence of Mr James Mitchell, Burnside, Porirua, Jane, the beloved wife of Mr Robert Miller, Tauerue Station, Wairarapa, aged 30 years.”

Following Jane’s death, Robert married Mary Ellen Angell on 22 January 1873.

Robert Miller died on 24 October 1904 aged 73.  The Wairarapa Daily Times of 28 October 1904 carried the Death Notice: Miller – On the 24th October, 1904, at his residence “Waiwetu” Tasman street Wellington, Robert Miller, aged 73 years.”  The Manawatu Times of 26 October 1904 reported, “Mr Robert Miller, one of Wellington’s early settlers, who came to Port Nicholson in the ship Blenheim in 1840, died yesterday.”  The Evening Post of 24 October 1904 published the following obituary:

Mr. Robert Miller, one of Wellington’s early settlers, died at his residence in Tasman-street this morning. About a fortnight ago he was seized with a paralytic stroke, from which he did not recover. The deceased gentleman was born at Paisley, Scotland, and came out to Port Nicholson with his parents in the ship Blenheim in December, 1840. The family resided for some time on what is now the site of the Hotel Cecil. Mr. Robert Miller was in business in Wellington for many years, and afterwards went to live in retirement at the Hutt, but for some time before his death he had been a resident of Tasman-street. In years gone by he occupied a seat on the City Council, and he laboured in other ways to advance the interests of the city. He was a director of the Equitable Building and Investment Company, from its formation up till the time of his death, and was also a shareholder in other joint stock concerns. He has left a widow and a family of eleven, the eldest being Mr. W. Miller, of the Greymouth-Point Elizabeth Company. The late Mr. Miller was very highly respected.

Mary Ellen Miller died on 20 March 1940 aged 88.

Jane and Robert appear to have had at least five children:

  • William Miller, born in 1860, died in 1940, married Susan McLaren in 1883.  William Miller was an auctioneer, valuer and accountant, became the last clerk of the Miramar Borough Council and for ten years was Town Clerk at Johnsonville.
  • James Miller, born in 1861, died in 1862, aged 3 weeks.
  • Jane Miller, born in 1862
  • James Miller, born in 1865
  • Robert Alexander Mitchell Miller, born in 1867, died in 1940, married Evelyn Rose Aitchison in 1925. Farmed at Kopuaranga, Wairarapa with his brother from the early 1900s.

Sources:

William and Maria Miller

The Miller family were included on the embarkation and arrival lists for the Blenheim as coming from Glasgow.  They were:

  • William Miller, 28, labourer (embarkation), weaver (arrival)
  • Maria Miller, 27
  • Robert Miller, 9
  • Janet Miller, 7
  • Mary Miller, 5
  • Jane Miller, 2
  • Margaret Miller, born at sea

From subsequent documentation it appears that Maria’s name should have been recorded as “Marian”.


Return to The Blenheim People.


William Miller and Marian Leitch

The birth registration for her daughter Margaret and the death registration for her daughter Jane confirm that Marian’s maiden name was Leitch.

After arriving in New Zealand William and Maria had at least one further child:

  • James Miller, born in 1845, died in 1926, married Annie Elizabeth Wright Hopkirk in 1879.

Marian (Leitch) Miller died in 1847 aged 36.

William Miller and Jane Wilson

William Miller married again, to Jane Wilson in 1854.  They had further children, possibly including:

  • Adam Miller, born in 1857, died in 1886.
  • Elizabeth Miller, born in 1859.
  • Francis Miller, born in 1861.
  • Thomas Miller, born in 1864, died in 1866.

William Miller died on 2 August 1879. His death registration noted that he died at Nelson Street, Wellington, aged 67, with the cause of death being old age and general debility.  He was born in Paisley, Scotland and had been in New Zealand for 39 years.  There was only the marriage to “- Wilson” listed as taking place in Wellington, NZ.  Living issue were five males and five females.  The Evening Post of 2 August 1879 contained the following obituary:

One by one the “old identities” of Wellington are dropping off from our midst. This morning another old settler passed away, in the person of Mr. W. Miller, father of the City Councillor of that name. Mr. Miller arrived in Wellington on 27th December, 1840, in the ship Blenheim, which left the port of Greenock, Scotland, in the summer of that year. From that time till the day of his death he was a resident in Wellington. About 20 years ago he took the Commercial Hotel, Willis-street, and held the position of host until about four years ago, when he retired from business. Mr. Miller never took any very prominent part in public life, but was for a short period a member of the City Council during the time that Messrs. Borlase and Quin occupied seats as members of that body. Mr. Miller always enjoyed very good health until about two months ago, when he was seized with a serious illness, to which he finally succumbed early this morning at the ripe age of 68. Mr Miller was well known and very generally respected. The news of his death will be received with considerable regret, especially by the old, original settlers still left among us.

Jane (Wilson) Miller, William’s second wife, died on 24 August 1887, aged 64. The Evening Post of 25 August 1887 reported, “An inquest was held to-day by Dr. Johnston, Coroner, on the body of an elderly female patient at the Mount View Asylum, named Jane Miller, who died on Tuesday evening. The jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes. Deceased, who was an old settler in the district, and formerly kept the Commercial Hotel, had been an inmate of the institution for about a month.”

Robert Miller

Robert Miller was 9 years old when he travelled to New Zealand on the Blenheim in 1840.

Robert Miller and Jane Mitchell were married on 24 June 1859.   Jane Mitchell had also been a passenger on the Blenheim, as a 3 year old, travelling with her parents James Mitchell and Jane Stewart.

Robert Miller was a successful baker and businessman, and also served as a City Councillor.

Jane (Mitchell) Miller died on 24 October 1867. The Wellington Independent of 26 October 1867 carried the following Death Notice: “Miller – On October 24, at the residence of Mr James Mitchell, Burnside, Porirua, Jane, the beloved wife of Mr Robert Miller, Tauerue Station, Wairarapa, aged 30 years.”

Following Jane’s death, Robert married Mary Ellen Angell on 22 January 1873.

Robert Miller died on 24 October 1904 aged 73.  The Wairarapa Daily Times of 28 October 1904 carried the Death Notice: Miller – On the 24th October, 1904, at his residence “Waiwetu” Tasman street Wellington, Robert Miller, aged 73 years.”  The Manawatu Times of 26 October 1904 reported, “Mr Robert Miller, one of Wellington’s early settlers, who came to Port Nicholson in the ship Blenheim in 1840, died yesterday.”  The Evening Post of 24 October 1904 published the following obituary:

Mr. Robert Miller, one of Wellington’s early settlers, died at his residence in Tasman-street this morning. About a fortnight ago he was seized with a paralytic stroke, from which he did not recover. The deceased gentleman was born at Paisley, Scotland, and came out to Port Nicholson with his parents in the ship Blenheim in December, 1840. The family resided for some time on what is now the site of the Hotel Cecil. Mr. Robert Miller was in business in Wellington for many years, and afterwards went to live in retirement at the Hutt, but for some time before his death he had been a resident of Tasman-street. In years gone by he occupied a seat on the City Council, and he laboured in other ways to advance the interests of the city. He was a director of the Equitable Building and Investment Company, from its formation up till the time of his death, and was also a shareholder in other joint stock concerns. He has left a widow and a family of eleven, the eldest being Mr. W. Miller, of the Greymouth-Point Elizabeth Company. The late Mr. Miller was very highly respected.

Mary Ellen (Angell) Miller died on 20 March 1940 aged 88.

Jane and Robert appear to have had at least five children:

  • William Miller, born in 1860, died in 1940, married Susan McLaren in 1883.  William Miller was an auctioneer, valuer and accountant, became the last clerk of the Miramar Borough Council and for ten years was Town Clerk at Johnsonville.
  • James Miller, born in 1861, died in 1862, aged 3 weeks.
  • Jane Miller, born in 1862.
  • James Miller, born in 1865.
  • Robert Alexander Mitchell Miller, born in 1867, died in 1940, married Evelyn Rose Aitchison in 1925. Farmed at Kopuaranga, Wairarapa with his brother from the early 1900s.

Robert and Mary Ellen appear to have had at least seven children:

  • Emily Miller, born in 1873.
  • Marion Miller, born in 1875.
  • Adam John Miller, born in 1876, died in 1972, married Amelia Alice Helen Nicholls in 1905.
  • Walter Robert Miller, born in 1878, died in 1963, carpenter, moved to Canada in 1905, married Mary Ann Lambert.
  • Oliver Allen Miller, born in 1880, died in 1962.
  • Violet Annie Miller, born in 1881, died in 1965, married Archibald Coulter in 1904.
  • Ethel Janet Miller, born in 1883, died in 1967.
Janet Miller

Janet Miller was 7 years old when she travelled to New Zealand on the Blenheim with her family.

Janet Miller married John William Laing in 1854.

John William Laing died in 1909.  The Otago Witness of 6 January 1909 carried the following obituary:

MR JOHN WILLIAM LAING.
Another of the fast diminishing band of early settlers passed to his rest on 2nd inst. John W. Laing, a son of the Manse, was born in Crieff, Perthshire, in 1826. His father was minister of the Established Church there, and his grandfather, Mr Wm. Laing, of Edinburgh, was the well-known collector of rich and rare literary productions, and his opportunity came during the Napoleonic wars, when private and public collections of priceless value were scattered over the continent. During one of the brief intervals of peace, Mr Laing crossed to the continent and secured very many books of great value, and thus laid the foundation of a collection which became unique in Scotland. Mr Wm. Laing was one of the founders and first directors of the Commercial Bank of Scotland. On the mother’s side, Mr John Wm. Laing was descended from one of the most famous of Scottish families, his mother being a daughter of Professor Gregory, of Edinburgh. Professor Gregory’s father also filled the chair of medicine in Edinburgh University, while others of the same family filled the chairs of astronomy and mathematics. His uncle, Dr David Laing, was the well-known librarian of the Advocates Library, Edinburgh, and an antiquarian and scholar, deeply versed in Scottish history and literature. Mr John Wm. Laing was educated at Menzie Boarding School and at the High School and University, Edinburgh. In 1842, he, accompanied by his friend, Mr Wm. Landsborough, sailed in the barque, Duke of Richmond, for Sydney. The young men went to the sheep station of Landsborough’s brother in the New England district. Both young men had been sent out to learn colonial farming. Taking a share in the station, Mr Laing remained there six or seven years. His friend took to exploring the back country, especially Queensland, and subsequently became famous as an explorer. Mr Landsborough returned to the Homeland, where he was honoured by Royalty, but Mr Laing came to New Zealand—a move he always regretted He arrived in Wellington by a trading schooner, and some time afterwards came on to Dunedin to visit his three brothers, who had taken up land in and around Dunedin. Liking the climate of Otago, he went back to New South Wales to wind up his affairs. Having capital, on his return he bought up city and suburban property, and made his home at Brockville, Halfway Bush, where he lived a very retired Iife until within the last ten years, when he removed to Ramsay Lodge, Stafford-street, Dunedin. He leaves a widow, and a family of five daughters and four sons, two of the sons being Messrs W. M. Laing, of “Glencrieff,” Bideford, and David Laing, of New Plymouth.

Janet (Miller) Laing died in 1915, aged 81.

Janet and John had nine children:

  • Jean Gregory Laing, born in 1855, died in 1905.
  • Mary Laing, born in 1857, died in 1918, married Arthur Harding Parkinson in 1901.
  • William Laing, born in 1859, died in 1938, married Jessie Elizabeth Cameron (cousin).
  • Helen Laing, born in 1862,  died in 1943.
  • John Laing, born in 1864, died in 1944.
  • Margaret Laing, born in 1866, died in 1950, married Alexander Durrand in 1894.
  • Wilhelmina Laing, born in 1868, died in 1962.
  • James Miller Laing, born in 1870.
  • David Laing, born in 1873.
Mary Miller

Mary Miller travelled with her family on the Blenheim as a  5-year old in 1840.

In 1857 Mary Miller married William Oliver, and went to live in Napier.  William Oliver, a bricklayer, died in 1882.

Mary (Miller) Oliver died on 20 September 1927. The Evening Post of 27 September 1927 carried the following obituary:

There died at Napier last week Mrs. Mary Oliver, widow of the late William Oliver, at the age of 92. The deceased lady had resided in Napier since 1858. Mrs. Oliver was born in Paisley, Scotland, and was a daughter of the late Mr. William Miller, who landed in Wellington on the ship Blenheim, with a family of six, in 1840. The members of this family have been identified with the Wellington district since the foundation, of the city. Mr. Miller, senior, was well known as the owner of the Commercial Hotel, erected on the present site of the Grand Hotel, Willis street, and was one of the first members of the Wellington City Council, having been elected in 1870. The only remaining member of this family who landed from the ship Blenheim is Mrs. Allan Cameron, now of Pearce street, Seatoun, who was two months old when she was carried ashore at Pipitea Point in December, 1840.

Mary and William appear to have had at least eight children:

  • James Oliver, born in 1858, died in 1923, married Fanny Clara Warwick in 1883.
  • William Oliver, born in 1860, died in 1916, married Mary Jane Mollet in 1885.
  • U/k Oliver, born in 1862, died in 1862.
  • Charles Miller Oliver, born in 1866, died in 1938, [married Harriet Bond].
  • Mary Oliver, born in 1868, died in 1953.
  • Robert Leslie Oliver, born in 1871.
  • Ellen Oliver, born in 1873, died in 1959, married Joseph William Beagley in 1902.
  • Thomas Oliver, born in 1875, died in 1944, married Catherine Croskery in 1921.
Jane Miller

Jane Miller was only 2 years old when she boarded the Blenheim in 1840.

The following information corrects the previous entry, and follows the comment below from Ron Carswell.

Jane Miller married David Carswell on 5 June 1858, at the private residence of Robert Miller, Cuba Street, Wellington.  David Carswell was a baker of 23, a bachelor, and Jane Miller was a spinster of 22.  The celebrant was Rev. John Moir, and the witnesses were James Campbell and Daniel Williams.

In the Hawkes Bay Herald of 28 August 1858, David Carswell, Bread and Fancy Biscuit Maker, Carlyle Street, Opposite Mr Kelly’s Store, begged to intimate that he had commenced business as above, and that no effort would be spared on his part to merit a share of public patronage. Bread would be delivered daily, with country orders punctually attended to.

David Carswell appeared fairly regularly on jury lists and electoral rolls for Napier, identified as a baker, but it appears that he and Jane may have lived apart.  In her will, Jane Carswell of Hastings, storekeeper, noted that she was wife of David Carswell of Nuhaka, settler, and she named John Kerr and Daniel William Harper of Hastings as executors of the will – they were her sons-in-law.  At the time of her daughter’s marriage to Daniel Harper, the notice in the Daily Telegraph of 18 April 1884 stated: “Harper-Carswell. At Hastings, at the residence of the bride’s mother, on April 17th, by the Rev. W, Nichol, D.W. Harper to Jane, second daughter of David Carswell, baker, formerly of Hastings. Wellington and Dunedin papers please copy.”

Jane (Miller) Carswell died on 19 February 1901, at Hastings.  Her death registration records that she was 62 and her parents were William Miller and Miriam Miller, formerly Leitch, trader; she was born in Paisley, Scotland, and had been in New Zealand for 52 years [sic], and was married to David Carswell in Wellington when she was 19; living issue included 4 males, aged between 21 and 42, and 7 females, aged between 23 and 40.  The cause of death was carcinomic tumour, 5 years, and gradual heart failure, 1 week, as certified by J A Macdonell MD.  The informant was J B E Hird, son-in-law, Hastings.

David Carswell died two months later on 19 April 1901.

It appears that Jane and David had at least eleven children (this information remains to be clarified), including the following:

  • John William Carswell, born in 1859, died in 1940, married Catherine Flaws in 1881.
  • David Carswell, born in 1860, died in 1940, married (1) Ada Williams in 1890 and (2) Eva May Williams in 1908.
  • Janet Carswell, born in 1861, died in 1905.
  • James Carswell, born in 1863, died in 1944.
  • Jane Carswell, born in 1865, died in 1943, married Daniel William Harper in 1884.
  • Margaret Carswell, born in 1867, died in 1951, married James Buckman Elms Hird in 1887.
  • Isabella Augusta Carswell, born in 1870, died in 1904, married John Kerr in 1891.
  • Annie Carswell, born in 1873, died in 1959, married James Hay in 1905.
  • Mary Miller Carswell, born in 1875, died in 1950, married John Andrew Frizzell in 1898.
  • Elizabeth Ellen Carswell, born in 1877
  • Charles William Carswell, born in 1879.
Margaret Miller

Margaret Miller was born on the Blenheim on the voyage out to New Zealand.

Jessie Campbell’s journal entry for Wednesday 14 October notes, “A woman delivered of a daughter today both doing well.”  The birth registration in New Zealand, dated 24 January 1841, noted that Margaret, 5th child of William Miller and Marian Leitch, both late of Paisley, was born 12th October 1840.

Margaret Miller and Allan Cameron were married on 17 March 1863.  Allan Cameron had also travelled to New Zealand on the Blenheim as a 5 year old with his parents Allan Cameron and Janet (Jessie) Grant.  The Wellington Independent of 26 March 1863 carried the Marriage Notice: “Cameron-Miller – March 17, at Wellington, by the Rev. John Moir, Allan Cameron, Esq., sheepfarmer, Province of Wellington, to Margaret, daughter of William Miller, Esq., proprietor of the Commercial Hotel.”

Margaret and Allan had six children:

  • Jessie Elizabeth Cameron, born in 1864, died in 1946, married William Miller Laing (cousin) in 1887.
  • William Allan Cameron, born in 1866, died in 1902, married Margaret Lang in 1895.
  • Charles Archibald Cameron, born in 1869, died in 1943, married Mary Crawford in 1903.
  • James Hugh Cameron, born in 1870, died in 1939, married Fanny Alexander Christina Wheeler Ahradsen in 1898.
  • Alexander John Cameron, born in 1873, died in 1926, married Helen Gregory Laing in 1899.
  • Robert Allan Cameron, born in 1876, died in 1954, married Euphemia Duncan Sutherland in Scotland in 1903.

Allan Cameron died on 23 November 1915.  The Wairarapa Daily Times of 24 November 1915 carried the following obituary:

One of the pioneer settlers of New Zealand, in the person of Mr Allan Cameron, died at Masterton yesterday, at the age of 83 years. The deceased arrived in the Dominion from Scotland in the ship Blenheim, which reached Wellington in December, 1840.

After residing in Wellington for some years, and experiencing exciting times, the deceased came to Wairarapa, taking up his residence at Te Whiti. Later he owned Bowlands station, and subsequently Spring Hill and Rewa Rewa.  He had resided in Masterton for the past sixteen years.

The late Mr Cameron was held in high esteem by all who met him, on account of his many sterling qualities, and his death will be deeply regretted. He is survived by four sons (Messrs C. A. Cameron, Masterton, J. H. Cameron, Masterton, A. J. Cameron, Makuri, and Dr. R. A. Cameron, Wellington), and one daughter (Mrs W. M. Laing, of Masterton), who will have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in their bereavement. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at 2 o ‘clock.

Margaret (Miller) Cameron died on 7 November 1934.  The Evening Post of 8 November 1934 reported:

The death occurred yesterday at Seatoun of Mrs. Allan Cameron, an old resident of the Wairarapa. Mrs. Cameron, who was in her 95th year, arrived in Wellington, with her parents, by the sailing ship Blenheim, on December 31, 1840. After her marriage, Mrs. Cameron went to the Wairarapa, and resided successively at Te Whiti, Bideford, and at “Rewa Rewa,” near Tinui. The late Mrs. Cameron is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Wm. Laing, Seatoun, and three sons Mr. Charles Cameron, Flat Point, Masterton; Mr. James Cameron, Tinui; and Dr. R. A. Cameron, Paraparaumu. Two sons predeceased her.  She is survived by twenty grandchildren and thirty-two great-grandchildren. The interment is taking place, at Masterton.

James Miller

James Miller was born in 1845 in Wellington.  In 1879 he married Annie Elizabeth Wright Hopkirk, and they went on to have at least seven children:

  • Isabella Agnes Miller, born in 1880, died in 1966.
  • Marion Margaret Miller, born in 1881, died in 1913, married Joseph Alfred Renall in 1906.
  • Grace Annie Miller, born in 1883, died in 1928, married John William Archibald Falloon in 1908.
  • Frederick James Miller, born in 1885, died in 1943.
  • Hugh Alexander Miller, born in 1887, died in 1968.
  • Ronald Miller, born in 1890, died in 1985.
  • Janet Laing Miller, born in 1892, died in 1971, married Clarence Villiers Smith in 1922.

James Miller died on 13 February 1926. The Evening Post of 15 February 1926 carried the following report:

The death is reported from Masterton, of Mr. James Miller, of Renall street, a pioneer settler who was closely associated with the welfare and advancement of the district. He took an active part in local politics, notably in connection with the Taueru Road Board and the Masterton County Council, Born in Wellington in 1845, he went to the Wairarapa in the early days of its settlement, and took up land in the Upper Taueru district 55 years ago. He retired twenty years ago to Masterton, The deceased leaves a widow, three sons (Messrs. F. J. Miller, Masterton, and H. A Miller, Waikato, and Rev. R. Miller, of Te Kuiti), and three, daughters (Miss Isa Miller, Masterton, Mrs. C. V. Smith, Waverley, and Mrs. J. W. Falloon, of Bideford). Another daughter (Mrs. J. A, Renall) died a few years ago.

Annie Elizabeth Wright (Hopkirk) Miller died on 4 February 1928, aged 76. The Evening Post of 8 February 1928 carried the Death Notice: “Miller – On the 4th February 1928, at her residence, 114, Renall street, Masterton, Annie, relict of the late James Miller, and eldest daughter of the late Robert Home Hopkirk; aged 76 years.”


James and Mary Brown

The Blenheim passenger lists recorded the Brown family as coming from Paisley and including:

  • James Brown, 28, labourer
  • Mary Brown, 30
  • Sarah Brown, 9
  • James Brown, 7
  • George Brown, 5
  • Elizabeth Brown 1½

Return to The Blenheim People.


James Brown and Mary Catherine Flynn

Based on family records listed in Ancestry.com, James Brown was born on 23 May 1806 in Abbey, Renfrewshire, to James Brown and Mary McKorkindale.  On 21 January 1831 he married Mary Catherine Flynn, who was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, in 1807.  The Old Parish Register for Abbey Parish, Renfrew, records that they were both of the parish and were married on 21 January 1831 by the Reverend Walter Blair, Paisley.

Following their arrival in New Zealand, James and Mary went on to have two more children:

  • David Brown, born in 1844, died in 1898.
  • Andrew Brown, born in 1846, died in 1926.

The Evening Post obituary for Elizabeth (see below), included a description of the family’s life in Wellington and the Hutt Valley, where they were the first European settlers in the Upper Hutt:

The voyage in the Blenheim terminated when that vessel anchored off Kaiwharawhara, and on landing there the Brown family were accommodated in a raupo whare provided for their use by the agent of the Kew Zealand Company. Shortly afterwards a removal was made to what is known as Alicetown, Lower Hutt, and at a later date to Belmont. The Brown family were the first settlers beyond the Silverstream-Taita Gorge — communication between these points being by means of a native track over the hills from Taita, across the stream in Stokes Valley, and again across the hills to where the Silverstream brickyards are now located. There was no way alongside the river on the eastern side, as the river ran close in to the hillsides there.
DETOUR AT TAITA. Having acquired possession of a piece of land extending from the neighbourhood of the Upper Hutt Post Office eastward beyond the Borough Council offices Mr. Brown proceeded to settle upon his holding and, placing his worldly goods upon a light dray trekked eastward towards Upper Hutt. The hills of Taita and Silverstream were impassable for wheeled traffic and the vehicle was taken apart, the wheels taken across separately, and the body slung on poles carried by the pioneer, assisted by a couple of stalwart settlers (Messrs. Galloway, of Pahautanui, and M’Ewan, of Rangitikei). On arrival at the eastern side of the gorge the vehicle was reassembled, and the kindly neighbours returned to their homes then at Lower Hutt. On arrival at Upper Hutt Mr. Brown erected a slab whare for his family, and covered it with a sail-cloth for a roof. He conducted the first tavern in the district, which was designated “The Shepherd,” and later on reconstructed and improved it, when it acquired the name of the “Criterion Hotel,” in which the Duke of Edinburgh stayed the night on the occasion of his visit to see the beauties of the Hutt River and native bush at the “Maori Bank.” A photograph of the hotel can be seen now in the Borough Council Chamber at Upper Hutt. The building, until recently temporarily occupied by the local Bank of Australasia, was the “stables” of the Criterion Hotel, and replaced the original stables which had been destroyed by fire on the night of the Duke’s visit. It has the honour of being the first store in Upper Hutt. The original business settlement having been established in the neighbourhood of the Oddfellows’ Hall, Trentham.

The Wellington Independent of 28 February 1871 included the Death Notice: “Brown – On Sunday, 26th February, at the Upper Hutt, Mr James Brown, after a severe and protracted illness, aged 61 years.”

Sarah Brown

The Old Parish Register for Abbey, Renfrew, recorded that Sarah, daughter, legal, of James Brown, weaver, Cotton Street, and Mary Flynn was born on 5 March 1831 and registered on 31 March 1831.

Sarah Brown was listed as a child of 9 when she boarded the Blenheim for New Zealand.

Sarah Brown married James Wilson in 1849. The couple had 13 children:

  • Mary Wilson, born in 1850, died in 1905.
  • James Wilson, born in 1852.
  • William Henry Wilson, born in 1854, died in 1938, married Christine Charlotte Fagan in 1890.
  • John Wilson, born in 1856, died in 1923.
  • Elizabeth Wilson, born in 1858, died in 1921.
  • Joseph James Wilson, born in 1861, died in 1935, married Catherine McTaggart in 1897.
  • Alexander Francis Wilson, born in 1863, died in 1935, married Adelaide Sophia Worsfold in 1888.
  • George Wilson, born in 1865, died in 1923, married Lydia Mary Riley in 1904.
  • Annie Wilson, born in 1867, died in 1941, married James McLeod in 1892.
  • David Bernard Wilson, born in 1869, died in 1960, married Fanny Louisa Wilson in 1895.
  • Agnes Wilson, born in 1871, died in 1946.
  • Sarah Jane Wilson, born in 1873, died in 1957.
  • Emily Mary Wilson, born in 1875, died in 1946 (Sister Basil).

James Wilson died on 7 July 1912, aged 83.  The Hutt Valley Independent of 13 July 1912 had the following obituary for James Wilson:

JAMES WILSON: Mr. James Wilson, one of Upper Hutt’s early settlers, who for some years has resided in Rangitikei, died at Makino on Sunday last, being 83 years of age. Deceased had an eventful career. Bom in Ireland, he came 67 years ago to New Zealand with the 65th Regiment, and took part in Hone Heke’s war and several other campaigns. He afterwards settled at Upper Hutt, where he married a sister, of James Brown, sen, and Mrs. Alex Martin. While at Upper Hutt he acted as instructor to the local militia at the blockhouse in the rear of the Trentham post office. After farming at Upper Hutt for a number of years, he went to Makino, where he has resided for some thirty years past. Deceased had been ailing for the past five years. Mrs. Wilson, who is an invalid, survives her husband, with six sons and five daughters. The sons are Messrs. W. H. and J. (Feilding), J. J. (Christchurch), A. F. (Levin), G. E. (Auckland), and David (Wellington). Mrs. McLeod (Makino) is the eldest daughter, and the others are unmarried.

Sarah (Brown) Wilson also died in 1912.  The Feilding Star of 23 November 1912 carried the Death Notice:”Wilson – At Makino, on Nov. 22, Sarah, relict of the late James Wilson, R.I.P. No flowers by request.”

James Brown

James Brown was 7 when he emigrated to New Zealand on the Blenheim with his family.

After living in the Lower and Upper Hutt Valley with his family, in 1852 James set off for the Australian goldfields, being joined by his brother George.  They returned to the Hutt Valley by 1854 and began farming together.

James Brown. Photograph taken Sept 6th 1907 on his 74th birthday. [P3-11-48] http://uhcl.recollect.co.nz/nodes/view/1740#idx1693The Evening Post of 24 December 1913 carried an article entitled “Seventy-Three Years Ago”, which recalled the arrival of the Blenheim in 1840, and noted:

Of the 300 who came out in her only seven are now alive. One of these is Mr. James Brown, of Wellington (now 80 years of age), who lived at the Lower Hutt with his parents for seven years and then removed to the Upper Hutt, the family being the first settlers there. His brother (Mr. George Brown) and one of his sisters (Mrs. James Wilson), both of whom died 18 months ago, also came out in the Blenheim. In addition to Mr. James Brown, Mr. James Nicol (Masterton), Mrs. Miller (Carterton), Messrs. Donald Fraser and Cameron (Rangitikei), Mrs. A. Martin, sen. Upper Hutt), and Mr. Donald Cameron (Greytown], who were also passengers, are still alive.

The Dominion of 26 July 1916 carried the Death Notice: “Brown – At his late residence. 104 Abel Smith Street, Wellington, James Brown, late of Upper Hutt, aged 83 years. R.I.P.”

The Evening Post of 25 July 1916 carried the following obituary:

The company of the Blenheim immigrants, who landed here in 1841 suffered a further diminution yesterday by the death of Mr. James Brown. His father (Mr. James Brown, sen.) was one of the Port Nicholson settlers and lived for many years in the Hutt Valley, eventually settling at Upper Hutt. James Brown, the younger, took part in the early gold rushes, and was at Ballarat at the time of the riots. Finally he settled on the land, in partnership with his brothers George (since deceased) and Andrew. That was about 1854. The brothers experienced all the trials which confronted the early pioneers at a time when communication with other settlements was difficult, and the temper of the Natives was uncertain Mr. Brown retired from active work over a decade ago, and shortly afterwards came to reside in Wellington. Hence he was a well-known figure, especially amongst people who delighted to hear of the early history of the settlement of the province. Though 82 years of age, at the time of his death he was, till a few weeks ago, remarkably active, both physically and mentally. His reminiscences were always interesting. The illness which carried him off came upon him about three weeks ago. He was never married, and his nearest surviving relatives are Mr. Andrew Brown (a brother), and Mrs. Martin (a sister, and one of the Blenheim immigrants), both of whom reside at Upper Hutt.

George Brown

George Brown was 5 when he sailed to Wellington on the Blenheim.

After living in the Hutt valley with his parents he went off in 1853 to join his brother on the goldfields in Australia, but returned to the Hutt.  George Brown married Jemima Hunter on 9 May 1875, but they appear to have had no children. Jemima died in 1898.

The Dominion of 25 March 1912 carried the following obituary:

MR. GEORGE BROWN, J.P.: HUTT PIONEER. There passed away at 1 p.m. yesterday another of Wellington’s pioneers, in the person of Mr. George Brown, J. P., of Buller Street, who has been a resident of the district for the past seventy-two years. He was born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1835, and sailed from the Clyde with his parents in the ship Blenheim, when five years of age, arriving here on the eve of the same year. With his parents, he resided in the Hutt Valley, working on the farm until May, 1853, when he went to join his brother, Mr. James Brown (also of Wellington), who a year previously had gone away to try his luck on the Victorian goldfields. The two brothers went through all the trials and hardships of life on the goldfields for five years, both in Australia and Otago. Finally the deceased returned to the Upper Hutt district, and turned his energies to farming, in which occupation he continued up till about six years ago, when he retired, and came to live in town. He always took an interest in public affairs, and represented the Mungaroa Riding on the Hutt County Council for twelve years, finally retiring on account of ill-health. His father, the late Mr. James Brown, owned and built the first hotel in the Upper Hutt, “The Shepherd’s Inn” (later known as The Criterion, but since demolished). Deceased was a member of the Hutt Licensing Committee, and took keen interest generally in advancing the district’s welfare. He was a valued member of tho S.P.C.A. up to the time of his death, and as a Justice of the Peace rendered good service to his district over a very long period. Like his father, he was one of the militiamen called out to meet the Maoris at Boulcott’s Farm, Lower Hutt, upon the historic occasion when Bugler Allen, “the boy hero”, died under such tragic circumstances, in giving a timely alarm to the settlers in the vicinity. Deceased, whose widow survives him, leaves numerous relatives and a big host of friends in this district.

The obituary carried in the Hutt Valley Independent of 30 March 1912, after providing details of the funeral service, gave some further details of George Brown’s life:

Deceased was born at Paisley, Scotland, in the year 1835, and left the Clyde, for New Zealand, on September 6, 1840, in the ship “Blenheim,” with his parents and a large company of other Scottish settlers, arriving at Wellington on Christmas Eve 1840. The family settled at the Hutt, and in 1853, he left for Australia, en route for the Victorian goldfields, to join his elder brother James, who had gone across the year previous. The two brothers remained on the goldfields for some five years, and took a prominent part in all the meetings which culminated in what are known in Australian history as the “Ballarat Riots.” Returning to New Zealand, he, with his brother David, and his, brother-in-law, James Wilson, went to the Otago Goldfields in 1860, and returned to Upper Hutt a couple of years later, where he resided with the other members of the family. From 1860 to 1870 he served in the Militia, which had been called out owing to the Maori troubles. In 1870, on the recommendation of the late Hon. Sir P. A. Buckley, Mr. G. Brown was appointed a Justice of the Peace. The deceased gentleman was married in 1872 to Jemima, the youngest daughter of the late Robert Hunter of Lower Hutt. For twelve years Mr. Brown represented the Mangaroa riding on the Hutt County Council, when he retired owing to failing health. As an active member of the committee of the Wellington Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Mr. Brown, after he took up his abode in the city, rendered valuable aid to Inspector Seed, who speaks enthusiastically of his work for the Society, The deceased gentleman, on all occasions took a lively part in local and general politics, he, in conjunction with his brother James, has been a generous friend to the Sisters of Mercy, and has proved an ardent supporter of the Catholic Church locally.

Elizabeth Brown

Elizabeth Brown was only 1½ when she travelled on the Blenheim to New Zealand.

Elizabeth Brown married Alexander Gordon Martin on 18 April 1855, and the couple went on to have 12 children:

  • Jane Martin, born in 1855, died in 1942, married John Golder in 1877.
  • James Martin, born in 1857, died in 1945.
  • William Henry Martin, born in 1860, died in 1957.
  • Isabella Martin, born in 1862, died in 1945, married Patrick McGrath in 1905.
  • Mary Elizabeth Martin, born in 1864, died in 1904.
  • Thomas Martin, born in 1867, died in 1884.
  • Elizabeth Martin, born in 1869, died in 1929, married Timothy Moynihan in 1907.
  • Helen Martin, born in 1872, died in 1960.
  • Alexander Gordon Martin, born in 1874, died in 1910.
  • Emma Martin, born in 1876, died in 1948, married John Larmer in 1909.
  • David Martin, born in 1879, died in 1946.
  • John Alexander Martin, born in 1882, died in 1955.

Alexander Gordon Martin died on 27 May 1902 aged 68.

Elizabeth (Brown) Martin died on 6 December 1929.  The Evening Post of 23 December 1929 carried the following obituary:

MR. BROWN’S DRAY: PIONEERING STORY: FOUNDER OF UPPER HUTT: LAST CHILD DEAD AT 91 (Contributed.)

By the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Martin on Friday, 6th December, 1929 Upper Hutt lost the last original settler of a hardy pioneering Scots family. Born at Paisley, Scotland, 91 years ago, she left the Clyde in September, 1840, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Brown, and other members of the family, arriving in Port Nicholson on 27th December, 1840.

[see above for a description of move to Upper Hutt]

MAORI TROUBLES—THE STOCKADE. Mrs. Martin had two brothers (James and George) and one sister, Sarah (Mrs. Wilson), older than herself, and two brothers, David and Andrew, born in New Zealand, all of whom predeceased her. The deceased lady, though sorely troubled with rheumatism in later life, retained all her faculties until a few hours before her death, and could speak clearly and with wonderful detail upon historical and domestic matters of the Hutt Valley from the sea eastward. She gave vivid pictures of the many hardships and anxieties of the pioneers; of the floods of the Hutt River—half-a-dozen a year—when the water ran through their house in the Lower Valley; of the first bridge over the Hutt River; of the Maori troubles and the early morning attack on Boulcott’s Farm outpost, when Bugler Allen was killed while sounding the alarm; of the building of the stockade at Trentham near what is now known as “Quinn’s Post” Hotel; the local bushfire fights, and the several sawmilling industries of the district— three mills operating at the same time between Whiteman’s Valley road and the Upper Hutt Catholic Church on the main road frontage.

Mrs. Martin was of a kindly nature and ever willing to help anyone in need. She was a keen gardener, and her residence was surrounded with choice plants and flowers, and was one of the beauty spots of the Upper Hutt. She was the first lady elector to record a vote at a Parliamentary election in the upper end of the Hutt Valley. Her husband, Mr. Alexander Martin, a native of Kirkcudbright, Scotland, died 27 years ago. Of her family of twelve there are nine still living. The sons are James, of Upper Hutt, for many years connected with the New Zealand Railways; William, of New Plymouth, farmer; David, of Wanganui, of the White Star Motor Service; and John, of Hastings, fruit expert; and the daughters are Jane (Mrs. Golder), of Upper Hutt; Isabel (Mrs. M’Grath), Elizabeth (Mrs. Monihan), of Wellington; Emma (Mrs. Larmer) and Helen, of Upper Hutt. There are 42 grandchildren and 53 great-grandchildren.


Sources:

Photographs:

  • Upper Hutt Library, Recollect, James Brown Jnr, from Alexander Turnbull Library, 592 1/11